Bruce E. Baker

HIS2170: History of New Orleans

Tutor: Dr Bruce Baker
Armstrong Building Room 1.24
(0191) 208 3636
bruce.baker@newcastle.ac.uk
Office Hours: TBC
Semester: 2
timing TBC

Module Content:

New Orleans, the major port at the outlet of the Mississippi River, has been one of the most important cities in North America over the last three centuries. Particular focuses of this module will be on the relationship between the city and the natural and built environment, the economy of New Orleans and its place within wider trading patterns, the nature and legacies of slavery, and the development of the unique culture of New Orleans.

Teaching and Assessment

Lectures, Seminars, and Private Study

All students are expected to turn up, prepared, to all lectures and seminars. If you are unable to attend due to illness, or for any other reason, please e-mail me in advance. The purpose of the seminars is to provide you with the opportunity to talk over the reading you have done on the week's topic and to discuss key events and themes from the history of New Orleans. Alongside the seminars you are expected to complete approximately 268 hours of private study during the course of the semester.

Tutorials

I will be available during my weekly Office Hours for individual advice and guidance. If the Office Hours conflict with one of your other classes, you may be able to make an appointment with me for an alternative time.

Reading

You will be expected to devote a considerable amount of time (approximately 8 hours) each week to preparatory reading. It is essential that you do the reading before attending the lecture and do not rely simply on the lecture itself. It will be assumed that you have gained some sense of the chronology and events through your own reading. The reading list below should provide a basis for preparatory reading for the lectures, seminars, assessed coursework, and revision. This list is, however, only a starting point and you should feel free to pursue and develop your own interests within the field.

Assessment

This module uses a combination of different forms of assessment as follows.
  • Online Quiz (15%)
    Geography determined the site of New Orleans, and its multinational, multiethnic history and heritage gives it a culture and vocabulary all its own. To understand the history of the city, you need to have a working knowledge of the geography and nomenclature that is distinct to the Crescent City. This online quiz must be completed by the end of Week 2.
  • Research Report (35%)
    Writing concise, well-structured reports on research is an important skill for historians and in many other contexts. In this assignment, you will pick from a set list of topics and be given a research question and a set of primary sources. You must produce a research report of 2000 words that follows a specified format. Essentially, you are doing a task that a research assistant does to support a principal investigator: imagine that the principal investigator you are writing the report for will use it as the basis for writing or to determined whether further research in an areas is needed.
    • Statement of Scope of Report (200 words)
      Discuss your understanding of what the question is asking for, along with a clear statement of what aspects of the what aspects of the question your report was and was not able to answer. Make any suggestions you think appropriate for how the question might be refined or reframed.
    • Discussion of Primary Sources (300 words)
      List the primary sources you were given and any others you used for the report. Give full citation information for each and a brief explanation of the nature of the source and the publication or archive from which it came.
    • Historiography (300 words)
      Provide a bibliography of the key secondary works you used to prepare the report, along with others that might be relevant that you were unable to access. Briefly explain the key issues in the current historiography around this topic.
    • Report (1000 words)
      Write a concise summary of your answer to the question assigned. It should be structured as any other essay with a clear thesis and good organisation, though there is no need for a standard introduction and conclusion since those are addressed in other parts of the research report.
    • Further Research (200 words)
      Give your suggestions for further research that might be pursued in relation to this research report. This might be other primary sources to look for or examine, secondary reading that would deepen or expand our understanding or related research questions and topics that arise out of the work you have done.

  • Group Project The final set of assessments for this module are built around a group project. Each student will look at the list of possible topics here and use this web form to indicate their top five choices (which must come from at least three categories). Informed by those preferences, I will then assign students to a group; each group will have five students. Each group should then begin to discuss how they plan to divded up the work on the overall project in order to allocate a discrete 2000-word section to each group member. Groups are encouraged to discuss and plan the project and research collectively, but each member will be responsible for, and marked on, their own 2000-word section. This will be marked individually and is worth 30% of the mark for the module. Groups will collectively do a five-minute presentation about their project in class in Week 12 which is worth 10% of the module mark. Groups will also collectively produce a version of their project for a website page using at least one or two images. The webpage will be due in Week 12, will be marked collectively, and is worth 10% of the final mark.

Schedule

Need to rearrange and retitle some of these
  • Week 1
    • Lecture - Introduction
    • Lecture - Indians & French settlement
    • Seminar - A River and Its City (Prologue, Ch. 1)
  • Week 2
    • Lecture - New Orleans in the French empire / online geography quiz due
    • Lecture - slavery in colonial New Orleans
    • Seminar - research report workshop
  • Week 3
    • Lecture - Louisiana Purchase
    • Lecture - economy in the flatboat era
    • Seminar - A River and Its City (Ch. 2)
  • Week 4
    • Lecture - slavery in antebellum New Orleans
    • Lecture - steamboat trade
    • Seminar - New Orleans in a Caribbean Slave Economy
  • Week 5
    • Lecture - urban politics and society
    • Lecture - religion
    • Seminar - Mardi Gras
  • Week 6
    • Surgery (2 hrs)
    • Seminar - group project workshop
  • Week 7
    • Lecture - Civil War
    • Lecture - Reconstruction
    • Seminar - Politics in Postreconstruction New Orleans
  • Week 8
    • Lecture - late nineteenth-century economy, esp. cotton
    • Lecture - New Orleans in a Caribbean context
    • Seminar - A River and Its City (Ch. 4)
  • Week 9
    • Lecture - modernisation of the city in the early twentieth century
    • Lecture - jazz
    • Seminar - A River and Its City (Ch. 5) - The 1927 Flood / research report due
  • Week 10
    • Lecture - literary New Orleans
    • Lecture - civil rights movement
    • Seminar - tourism
  • Week 11
    • Film - When the Levees Broke (2hrs out of total of 4hrs)
    • Seminar - group project presentations
  • Week 12
    • Surgery (2hrs)
    • Seminar - revision

Reading List

This is a work in progress. Eventually, the reading list will be divided into "essential" and "further" categories.

N.B. Most of the items listed here are available in the Robinson Library, with a few exceptions. If you are unable to find an item that you want you may wish to make use of other libraries in the area. If you still can't find it, please let me know.

Most of our primary source readings are available in digital format, and in many cases I have provided the links here.

General Reading

  • Lawrence N. Powell, The Accidental City: Improvising New Orleans (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2012)
  • Jason Berry, City of a Million Dreams: A History of New Orleans at Year 300 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2018)
  • Richard Campanella, Cityscapes of New Orleans (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2017)

Week 1

Lecture: Introduction

  • Andrei Codrescu, "New Orleans: A Lecture," Callaloo 29:4 (Autumn 2006): 1098-1102.
  • Creighton Bernette's first rant from Treme.
  • Christopher Morris, The Big Muddy: An Environmental History of the Mississippi and Its Peoples, from Hernando de Soto to Hurricane Katrina (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012)

Lecture: Indians and French settlement

  • Daniel H. Usner, American Indians in Early New Orleans: From Calumet to Raquette (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018)
  • F. Todd Smith, Louisiana and the Gulf South Frontier, 1500-1821 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2014)
  • Allan Greer, "National, Transnational, and Hypernational Historiographies:New France Meets Early American History," Canadian Historical Review 91:4 (Dec. 2010): 695-724. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/403376
  • Cécille Vidal, "From Incorporation to Exclusion: Indians, Europeans, and Americans in the Mississippi Valley from 1699 to 1830," in Peter J. Kastor and François Weil, Empires of the Imagination: Transatlantic Histories of the Louisiana Purchase (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009), 62-92
  • Cécille Vidal, "Introduction: Louisiana in Atlantic Perspective," in Cécille Vidal, ed., Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), ?????
  • Tristram R. Kidder, "Making the City Inevitable: Native Americans and the Geography of New Orleans," in Craig E. Colten, ed., Transforming New Orleans and Its Environs: Centuries of Change (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2000)
  • Christopher Morris, "Impenetrable but Easy: The French Transformation of the Lower Mississippi Valley and the Founding of New Orleans," in Craig E. Colten, ed., Transforming New Orleans and Its Environs: Centuries of Change (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2000)

Seminar: A River and Its City (Prologue, Ch. 1)

Week 2

Lecture: New Orleans in the French and Spanish Empires

  • Dianne Guenin-Lelle, The Story of French New Orleans: History of a Creole City (Jackson: University of Mississippi Press, 2016)
  • Shannon Lee Dawdy, Building the Devil's Empire: French Colonial New Orleans (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008)
  • Nathalie Dessens, From Saint-Domingue to New Orleans: Migration and Influences (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2007)
  • Gilbert C. Din and John E. Harkins, The New Orleans Cabildo: Colonial Louisiana's First City Government (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University, 1996)
  • Frances Kolb, "The New Orleans Revolt of 1768: Uniting against Real and Perceived Threats of Empire," Louisiana History 59:1 (Winter 2018): 5-39. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26476404
  • Sophie White, "Massacre, Mardi Gras, and Torture in Early New Orleans," William and Mary Quarterly 70:3 (July 2013): 497-538. https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5309/willmaryquar.70.3.0497
  • Sophie White, "'A Baser Commerce': Retailing, Class, and Gender in French Colonial New Orleans," William and Mary Quarterly 63:3 (July 2006): 517-550. https://www.jstor.org/stable/3877374
  • Erin M. Greenwald, Marc-Antoine Caillot and the Company of the Indies in Louisiana: Trade in the French Atlantic World (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University, 2016)
  • David Narrett, Adventurism and Empire: The Struggle for Mastery in the Louisiana-Florida Borderlands, 1762-1803 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2015)
  • Mary Williams, "Private Lives and Public Orders: Regulating Sex, Marriage, and Legitimacy in Spanish Colonial Louisiana," in Cécille Vidal, ed., Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), ?????
  • Kristin Condotta Lee, "Trading Spaces: Commerce, Ethnicity, and Early Irish New Orleans," Louisiana History 59:3 (Summer 2018: 261-307. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26564809
  • Cindy Ermus, "Reduced to Ashes: The Good Friday Fire of 1788 in Spanish Colonial New Orleans," Louisiana History 54:3 (Summer 2013): 292-331. https://www.jstor.org/stable/24396396

Lecture: Slavery in Colonial New Orleans

  • John Craig Hammond, "Slavery, Settlement, and Empire:The Expansion and Growth of Slavery in the Interior of the North American Continent, 1770-1820," Journal of the Early Republic 32:2 (Summer 2012): 175-206. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/475349
  • Caryn Cossé Bell, Revolution, Romanticism, and the Afro-Creole Protest Tradition in Louisiana, 1718-1868 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1997)
  • Kimberly S. Hanger, Bounded Lives, Bounded Places: Free Black Society in Colonial New Orleans, 1769-1803 (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1997)
  • Guillaume Aubert, "'To Establish One Law and Definite Rules': Race, Religion, and the Transatlantic Origins of the Louisiana Code Noir," in in Cécille Vidal, ed., Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), ?????
  • Sophie White, "Slaves and Poor Whites' Informal Economies in an Atlantic Context," in in Cécille Vidal, ed., Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), ?????
  • Emily Clark, "Atlantic Alliances: Marriage among People of African Descent in New Orleans," in Cécille Vidal, ed., Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), ?????
  • Cécille Vidal, "Caribbean Louisiana: Church, Métissage, and the Language of Race in the Mississippi Colony during the French Period," in Cécille Vidal, ed., Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), ?????
  • Thomas N. Ingersoll, Mammon and Manon in Early New Orleans: The First Slave Society in the Deep South, 1718-1819 (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1999)
  • Raushana Johnson, Slavery's Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans during the Age of Revolutions (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016)
  • Frances Kolb, "The New Orleans Revolt of 1768: Uniting against Real and Perceived Threats of Empire," Louisiana History 59:1 (Winter 2018): 5-39. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26476404

Seminar: Research report workshop

Week 3

Lecture: Louisiana Purchase and the Americanisation of New Orleans

  • Laurent Dubois, "The Haitian Revolution and the Sale of Louisiana; or, Thomas Jefferson's (Unpaid) Debt to Jean-Jacques Dessalines," in Peter J. Kastor and François Weil, Empires of the Imagination: Transatlantic Histories of the Louisiana Purchase (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009), 93-116.
  • Richard White, "The Louisiana Purchase and the Fictions of Empire," in Peter J. Kastor and François Weil, Empires of the Imagination: Transatlantic Histories of the Louisiana Purchase (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009), 37-61.
  • Peter J. Kastor and François Weil, "Introduction," in Peter J. Kastor and François Weil, Empires of the Imagination: Transatlantic Histories of the Louisiana Purchase (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009), 1-22.
  • Eberhard L. Faber, Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2016)
  • Nathalie Dessens, Creole City: A Chronicle of Early American New Orleans (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2015)
  • Shirley Elizabeth Thompson, Exiles at Home: The Struggle to Become American in Creole New Orleans (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2009)
  • James E. Wainwright, "William Claiborne and New Orleans's Battalion of Color, 1803-1815: Race and the Limits of Federal Power in the Early Republic," Louisiana History 57:1 (Winter 2016): 5-44. https://www.jstor.org/stable/43858277
  • Alexander Mikaberidze, "'The Dreams of Empire': The War of 1812 in an International Context," in Laura Lyons McLemore, ed., The Battle of New Orleans in History and Memory (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2016), ????
  • Eric Herschthal, "Slaves, Spaniards, and Subversion in Early Louisiana: The Persistent Fears of Black Revolt and Spanish Collusion in Territorial Louisiana, 1803-1812," Journal of the Early Republic 36:2 (Summer 2016): 283-311. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/620989
  • Julien Vernet, Strangers on Their Native Soil: Opposition to United States Governance in Louisiana's Orleans Territory, 1803-1809 (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2013)
  • Erin M. Greenwald, "To Strike a Balance: New Orleans' Free Colored Community and the Diplomacy of William Charles Claiborne," in Gene Allen Smith and Sylvia L. Hilton, eds., Nexus of Empire: Negotiating Loyalty and Identity in the Revolutionary Borderlands, 1760s-1820s (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2010), _______

Lecture: The New Orleans Economy Before Steam

Seminar: A River and Its City (Ch. 2)

Week 4

Lecture: Slavery in Antebellum New Orleans

  • Judith Kelleher Schafer, Becoming Free, Remaining Free: Manumission and Enslavement in New Orleans, 1846-1862 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2003)
  • Dennis C. Rousey, Policing the Southern City: New Orleans, 1805-1889 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1996)
  • Carol Wilson, The Two Lives of Sally Miller: A Case of Mistaken Racial Identity in Antebellum New Orleans (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2007)
  • Walter Johnson, Soul By Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1999)
  • Adam Rothman, Beyond Freedom's Reach: A Kidnapping in the Twilight of Slavery (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2015)
  • Shirley E. Thompson, "'Mon Cher Dupré': Interracial Marriage, Property, and Affect in Antebellum New Orleans," Louisiana History 58:2 (Spring 2017): 217-236. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26290900
  • Jane E. Dabel, "'My Ma Went to Work Early Every Mornin': Color, Gender, and Occupation in New Orleans, 1840-1860," Louisiana History 41:2 (Spring 2000): 217-229. https://www.jstor.org/stable/4233661
  • Whitney Nell Stewart, "Fashioning Frenchness:Gens de Couleur Libres and the Cultural Struggle for Power in Antebellum New Orleans," Journal of Social History 51:3 (Spring 2018: 526-547. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/697894
  • Paul F. Lachance, "The Limits of Privilege: Where Free Persons of Colour Stood in the Hierarchy of Wealth in Antebellum New Orleans," Slavery and Abolition 17 (April 1996): 65-84
  • Loren Schweninger, "Antebellum Free Persons of Color in Postbellum Louisiana," Louisiana History 30:4 (Autumn 1989), pp. 345-364. https://www.jstor.org/stable/4232755
  • Kenneth R. Alakson, Making Race in the Courtroom: The Legal Construction of Three Races in Early New Orleans (New York: New York University Press, 2014)

Lecture: New Orleans in the Steamboat Era

Seminar: New Orleans in a Caribbean Slave Economy

  • Walter Johnson, River of Dark Dreams: Slavery and Empire in the Cotton Kingdom (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2013)
  • Cécille Vidal, Caribbean New Orleans: Empire, Race, and the Making of a Slave Society (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2019)
  • Kenneth Asklakson, "The 'Quadroom-Plaçage' Myth of Antebellum New Orleans: Anglo-American (Mis)interpretations of a French-Caribbean Phenomenon," Journal of Social History 45:3 (Spring 2012): 709-734. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/468485
  • Robert Paquette, "Saint-Domingue and the Making of Territorial Louisiana," in David Barry Gaspar and David Geggus, eds., A Turbulent Time: The French Revolution and the Greater Caribbean (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1997), 204-225.
  • Freddi Williams Evans, Congo Square: African Roots in New Orleans (Lafayette: University of Louisiana at Lafayette Press, 2011)
  • Emily Clark, The Strange History of the American Quadroon: Free Women of Color in the Revolutionary Atlantic World (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013)
  • Pierre Force, "The House on Bayou Road: Atlantic Creole Networks in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries," Journal of American History 100:1 (June 2013): 21-45. https://www.jstor.org/stable/44308570
  • Elizabeth Urban Alexander, "Daniel Clark: Merchant prince of New Orleans," in Gene Allen Smith and Sylvia L. Hilton, eds., Nexus of Empire: Negotiating Loyalty and Identity in the Revolutionary Borderlands, 1760s-1820s (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2010), _______

Week 5

Lecture: Immigrants and Urban Politics

Lecture: Religion

Seminar: Mardi Gras

  • James Gill, Lords of Misrule: Mardi Gras and the Politics of Race in New Orleans (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1997)
  • Reid Mitchell, All on a Mardi Gras Day: Episodes in the History of New Orleans Carnival (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1995)
  • Jeroen Dewulf, From the Kingdom of Kongo to Congo Square: Kongo Dances and the Origins of the Mardi Gras Indians (Lafayette, La.: University of Louisiana at Lafayette Press, 2017)
  • Anthony J. Stanonis, "Through a Purple (Green and Gold) Haze," Southern Cultures 14:2 (Summer 2008): 109-131. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/237206
  • Jeroen Dewulf, "From Moors to Indians: The Mardi Gras Indians and the Three Transformations of St. James," Louisiana History 56:1 (Winter 2015): 5-41. https://www.jstor.org/stable/24396493

Week 6

Surgery (2 hrs)

Seminar: Group project workshop

Week 7

Lecture: Civil War

Lecture: Reconstruction

  • James K. Hogue, Uncivil War: Five New Orleans Street Battles and the Rise and Fall of Radical Reconstruction (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2006)
  • James G. Hollandsworth, Jr., An Absolute Massacre: The New Orleans Race Riot of July 30, 1866 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2001)
  • Justin A. Nystrom, New Orleans After the Civil War: Race, Politics, and a New Birth of Freedom (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 201???)
  • Michael A. Ross, The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case : Race, Law, and Justice in the Reconstruction Era (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015)
  • Michael A. Ross, "Justice Miller's Reconstruction: The Slaughter-House Cases, Health Codes, and Civil Rights in New Orleans, 1861-1873," Journal of Southern History 64:4 (Nov. 1998): 649-676. https://www.jstor.org/stable/2587513
  • James Illingsworth essay from After Slavery
  • John K. Bardes, "Redefining Vagrancy: Policing Freedom and Disorder in Reconstruction New Orleans, 18621868," Journal of Southern History 84:1 (February 2018): 69-112. http://muse.jhu.edu/article/685199

Seminar: Politics in Postbellum New Orleans

Week 8

Lecture: late nineteenth-century economy, esp. cotton

  • Lawrence N. Powell, ed., The New Orleans of George Washington Cable: The 1887 Census Office Report (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2008)
  • Eric Arnesen, Waterfront Workers of New Orleans: Race, Class, and Politics, 1863-1923 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1991)
  • Bruce E. Baker, "The Loose Cotton Economy of the New Orleans Waterfront in the Late Nineteenth Century," in Kenneth Lipartito and Lisa Jacobson, eds., Hidden Capitalism: Beyond, Below and Outside the Visible Market (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019), ______
  • Urmi Engineer Willoughby, Yellow Fever, Race, and Ecology in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2017)

Lecture: New Orleans in a Caribbean context

Seminar: A River and Its City (Ch. 4)

Week 9

Lecture: New Orleans Enters the Twentieth Century

Lecture: Jazz

FOOD
  • Marcie Cohen Ferris, "The Edible South, Southern Cultures 15:4 (Winter 2009): 3-27. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/363378
  • Anthony J. Stanonis and Rachel Wallace, "Tasting New Orleans: How the Mardi Gras King Cake Came to Represent the Crescent City," Southern Cultures 24:4 (Winter 2018): 6-23. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/712823
  • Elizabeth M. Williams, "Red Gravy, Southern Cultures 15:4 (Winter 2009): 133-136. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/363389
  • Susan Tucker, ed., New Orleans Cuisine: Fourteen Signature Dishes and Their Histories (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2009)

Seminar: A River and Its City (Ch. 5): The 1927 Flood / Research report due

Week 10

Lecture: Literary New Orleans

  • Emily Epstein Landau, Spectacular Wickedness: Sex, Race, and Memory in Storyville, New Orleans (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2013)
  • Delia LaBarre, ed., The New Orleans of Lafcadio Hearn: Illustrated Sketches from the Daily City Item (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2007)
  • S. Frederick Starr, ed., Inventing New Orleans: Writings of Lafcadio Hearn (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2001)
  • Laura Clark Brown, "New Orleans Modernism: The Arts and Crafts Club in the Vieux Carré, 1919-1939," Louisiana History 41:3 (Summer 2000): 317-343. https://www.jstor.org/stable/4233676
  • Barbara Eckstein, Sustaining New Orleans: Literature, Local Memroy, and the Fate of a City (New York: Routledge, 2005)
  • Louise McKinney, New Orleans: A Cultural History (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006)
  • Barbara C. Ewell and Pamela Glenn Menke, "The Awakening and the Great October Storm of 1893," Southern Literary Journal 42:2 (Spring 2010): 1-11. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/385453
  • Rien Fertel, Imagining the Creole City: The Rise of Literary Culture in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2014)
  • Ruth Salvaggio, Hearing Sappho in New Orleans: The Call of Poetry from Congo Square to the Ninth Ward (2012)
  • John Shelton Reed, Dixie Bohemia: A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2012)
  • Patricia Brady, "Literary Ladies of New Orleans in the Gilded Age," Louisiana History 3:2 (Spring 1992): 147-156. https://www.jstor.org/stable/4232936

Lecture: Civil Rights Movement

  • Liva Baker, The Second Battle of New Orleans: The Hundred-Year Struggle to Integrate the Schools (New York: Harper Collins, 1996)
  • Pamela Tyler, Silk Stockings and Ballot Boxes: Women and Politics in New Orleans, 1920-1963 (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1996)
  • Kim Lacy Rogers, Righteous Lives: Narratives of the New Orleans Civil Rights Movement (New York: New York University Press, 1993)
  • Leonard N. Moore, Black Rage: Police Brutality and African American Activism from World War II to Hurricane Katrina (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2010)
  • Michele Grigsby Coffey, "The State of Louisiana v. Charles Guerand: Interracial Sexual Mores, Rape Rhetoric, and Respectability in 1930s New Orleans," Louisiana History 54:1 (Winter 2013): 47-93. https://www.jstor.org/stable/24396435
  • Edward F. Haas, "The Expedient of Race: Victor H. Schiro, Scott Wilson, and the New Orleans Mayoralty Campaign of 1962," Louisiana History 42:1 (Winter 2001): 5-29. https://www.jstor.org/stable/4233715
  • R. Bently Anderson, Black, White, and Catholic : New Orleans Interracialism, 1947-1956 (Nashville: Vanderbilt. University Press, 2005)
  • Orissa Arend, Showdown in Desire: The Black Panthers Take a Stand in New Orleans (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 2009)

Seminar: Tourism

  • Anthony J. Stanonis, Creating the Big Easy: New Orleans and the Emergence of Modern Tourism, 1918-1945 (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006)
  • J. Mark Souther, New Orleans on Parade: Tourism and the Transformation of the Crescent City (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2006)
  • Anthony Stanonis, "'Always in Costume and Mask': Lyle Saxon and New Orleans Tourism," Louisiana History 42:1 (Winter 2001): 31-57. https://www.jstor.org/stable/4233717
  • Catherine Vesey and Frederic Dimanche, "From Storyville to Bourbon Street: Vice, Nostalgia and Tourism," Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change 1:1 (Jan. 2003): 54-70. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14766820308668159

Week 11

Film : When the Levees Broke (2hrs out of total of 4hrs)

Seminar: Group project presentations

Week 12

Surgery (2 hours)

Seminar: Revision

 

Page revision date: 31-Mar-2019

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